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The Jubilee Bible (w-Dictionary)

(3 customer reviews)

$24.99 $17.49

In the Jubilee Bible, careful attention has been given to translate Hebrew and Greek words consistently into the same English word. This translation uniformity is essential for serious Bible study and for personal application.

New: Thicker paper.

In the Jubilee Bible, careful attention has been given to translate Hebrew and Greek words consistently into the same English word. This allows the reader to follow a word through the Old Testament and into the New Testament, giving a clearer picture than ever before of what each word means in its own context. This translation uniformity is essential for serious Bible study and for personal application.

 

About the Texts

Based on the Scriptures from the Reformation era.

Translated into Spanish from the original texts in Hebrew and Greek by Casiodoro de Reina (1569) and compared with the revision of Cipriano de Valera (1602). Based on the New Testament of Francisco de Enzinas (1543) and on the New Testament (1556) with the Psalms (1557) of Juan Pérez de Pineda.

This material was then translated from Spanish into English by Russell M. Stendal and compared with the Old English Translation of William Tyndale (Pentateuch of 1530, Ploughboy Edition New Testament of 1534, Joshua to 2 Chronicles of 1537, and Jonah). It was also compared word for word with the Authorized Version (by King James) of 1611.

Specs: 10-point font, 6 x 9 x 1.25 in., 1,152 pages, imitation leather cover

 

About the Editor

Russell Stendal, a former hostage of Colombian rebels, is a lifelong missionary to that same group in the jungles of Colombia. He is an influential friend to military and government leaders in Colombia, Cuba, Mexico, Venezuela, and the United States. Russell’s ministry shares the gospel via twelve radio stations, hundreds of thousands of Bibles, books, and movies, which are distributed through airplane parachute drops. Accepting numerous speaking engagements for groups of leaders, prisoners, and individuals, Russell goes wherever the Lord leads, whether it’s to speak with a president or to go deep into the jungle to help an individual in trouble. Through this ministry, he has witnessed thousands commit their lives to Christ.

 


PDF eBook

 

eBook Version

 

Weight2.2 lbs
Dimensions9 × 6 × 1 in
Weight

2.2 lbs.

Dimensions

6” x 9” x 1.5”

Books

Old and New Testament

Font

10 pt.

Pages

1,152

Paper

Premium, Cream-Colored Bible Paper

ISBN

978-1-62245-182-1

Case Quantity

16 Bibles per carton

3 reviews for The Jubilee Bible (w-Dictionary)

  1. Linda Charest (verified owner)

    I have been reading this Bible for a few years and I love the way Russell carries the theme throughout the old and new testament. This Bible and his other writings have ministered to me greatly as I have pondered the reality of Christianity today as it is presented and been very concerned for the future of my family. I would recommend this to anyone who is searching for real answers.

  2. Adrian Riza (verified owner)

    It seems like I bought a slightly different version: the one shown on the website at the time of this review says New: Thicker paper and has Specs: 10 pt. font; 6” x 9” x 1.5”; 1152 pages, whereas the one I bought a few months back has Specs: 9 pt. font; 6” x 9” x 1.4”; 1088 pages. One of the things I wanted to comment on was the 9 pt. font size being too small but it seems this was improved to 10 pt. font and thicker paper, so I give it a 5 stars based on these facts. The Bible Dictionary at the end and the Concordance are very helpful; I wish the Concordance would have covered at least double the words (about 106 right now), but as it explains in the Introduction, you could make a search on the free online or PDF version for the word you are interested and find all the occurrences in this Bible. It seems like the publisher wanted to keep this book as compact as possible. Also, I really wish this Bible had more footnotes (very few in the one I bought) and less old, archaic words. True, there are less than in KJV Bible and the author explains why he kept some of the old words; still, this translation has a flavor of the old style language which in my opinion, it doesn’t appeal to the younger generation. I believe the language could have been modernized a little more and still has the clarity that is trying to achieve. The word “clarity” used instead of “glory” in many New Testament passages is something that I could not understand; even though the original word might have been different than the one translated with “glory”, I still cannot understand how the word “clarity” conveys the same meaning that the word “glory” does in the context where it is used. Same with “saving health” in lieu of “salvation”. All in all, I believe this is still a very good plus translation compared to most of the newer, NIV type translations.

  3. A.W Lund (verified owner)

    This is really two reviews in one, because I own both the 2010 paperback edition and the newest 2013 edition synthetic leather with premium edition paper.
    First of all, I have been a fan of this translation for almost ten years, and was given an in-expensive paperback copy published in 2010 at a ministry where they were being handed out. The paperback edition had an interesting Preface of the history of the translation and its goals and purpose from Russell M. Stendal. It also features a section on the translator’s notes and some difficult/misunderstood words and their definitions. The paperback edition also has line-matching, nice bold font, and the paper was white with only minimal bleed-through of the words. Footnotes were in brackets within the text itself, and it features a very short eight-and-a-half page dictionary at the back followed by 3 blank pages and 1 page of cardstock. It does not contain maps. and the binding is glued. I really liked this translation, but was dissapointed that there wasn’t a smyth sewn edition with better paper and inexpensive. Then I discovered that there was a newer edition with premium cream-colored (my favorite) bible paper and I had to get it.
    I bought the 2013 edition from Aneko Press website and they were very good about answering questions and getting back to my emails. The product description can be found on their website, but I also learned that the paper is non-glaring, premium tan-color with almost no bleed-through and a nice 40gsm thickness. The binding is smyth sewn and lays flat around the book of Numbers. The cover is tan-colored synthetic leather with a tree imprinted around the front, side, and part of the back and actually adds to the aesthetics of this Bible. Unlike some other faux- leather Bibles I own, this edition seems to resist marking and scuffing well and is smooth to the touch. The inside liner is smooth and pasted down very well, and the book includes one tan bookmark. This edition also contains some footnotes at the bottom that more accurately defines ekklasia as “called out ones” instead of just church. The use of the name “James” also has a footnote defining it more accurately as the actual name “Jacob.” The dictionary at the back of this edition is very extensive and also lists the number of occurrences for every word listed. This is extremly helpful, as is the concordant method of translating the same word as consistently as possible to allow patterns to form when the speaker/writer is connecting thoughts together. Again, with this edition, there are no maps at the back, unfortunately.
    The translation itself has offered some unique insights and seems to be more readable than the King James Version, and in some places, it is actually more accurate and more literal. I have been comparing the KJV/JB on my Bible app and more often than not, the Jubilee comes out better or is close to the KJV with few exceptions. Some examples of this are:
    ~Genesis 1:28 KJV has replenish- JB (Jubilee Bible) has fill *Jubilee is more accurate
    ~Job 11:8 KJV has Hell- JB has Sheol *JB is more literal as Hebrew uses the word Sheol.
    ~Acts 19:37 KJV has Robber of churches – JB has guilty of sacrilege *KJV incorrectly translated “ἱερόσυλος” as “churches” when it should have been “temples”. JB is less literal here, but more accurate to what is being said.
    ~KJV uses Unicorn- JB uses Rhinoceros
    ~There are many more examples, and I’d encourage anyone to buy this edition to read along with their other Bibles including the KJV. It is a very useful tool to have.
    Final Thoughts: I really like this Bible, and have found it very helpful in study and comparison. I would strongly encourage others to purchase it. I have also appreciated the Translators passion, and that it has kept in the Ye’s and thou’s to distinquish between singular and plural when a person/people are addressed. I also agree with another reviewer about the need to update the language just a bit more (but keep the Ye’s and thous) and including Maps as they are helpful for getting some context to the Bible. It would be neat to have a genuine leather edition and a KJV/Jubilee Parallel edition as well as a study edition with more notes on the older translations Russell is working with, which would be fascinating.

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